HomeKeeper Tip of the Week – Choosing Paint Colors You’ll Love Living With

Dare to be Bold 

Looking for some fresh new paint ideas? Have those home improvement shows got you itching for a change? We all get tired of the same old look year after year. If you think you might be ready for a change, check out some great ways on how to combine colors to add a fresh new look to your home without breaking the color compatibility rules.

 

 Monochromatic. These are the easiest of all. Start with a single color, say, blue, then just follow the color wheel to the center and choose various saturations of the same color to make your palette. Typically, a middling hue is used for the wall color, a darker color as accent and a lighter color (or just white) as trim paint. It’s a classic look for any color on the wheel.  

 

 

 

 

 

Complementary. Choose a color you like, then zip directly across the wheel to find its complement. Some of these work better than others. For example, red and green are great for the holiday season, but might be a bit much indoors. Now, if you’re painting the outside of your WWI-era cottage, that’s a whole different bag of pigment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analogous. One of the most subtle, but elegant configurations, analogous colors are colors that are literally right next to one another on the color wheel. These colors are similar, but different enough that it’s obvious. Blue, blue-green and green make a great combo for a relaxing spa-style bathroom, but I’ve even seen some wild stuff done with analogous shades of purple that really kind of took my breath away. Choose one as your primary and use the other two to support it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Triadic. For the bold and adventurous, triadic color schemes can create very personal spaces. Although these colors harmonize, in theory, they can be potential sales killers later, so if you go with a triadic color-scheme, don’t be offended if your future Realtor suggests a paint job. Start at the main color you want in the space, then choose the two colors that are equal distance away from it. For example, a triadic purple color scheme would include green and orange. Again, one color should dominate and the others support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tetradic. Much like the triadic color scheme, tetradic color schemes can be really loud if done incorrectly, so do so with caution. Instead of there being three colors spaced equally around the color wheel, this scheme uses four. So, if your main color was blue, you’d also use yellow-green, orange, and red-violet. Definitely not for every home or for the faint of heart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So go ahead and paint in confidence, and enjoy the colorful fruits of your labor!

Until Next week’s blog!

 

Posted on January 18, 2018 at 2:09 am
Kimberley Alvarez | Category: Home Improvement Tips | Tagged ,

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